Emotional Well Being

A pair of Caucasian hands with positive words written all over them in magic marker

Introduction

Emotional well-being recognizes awareness and acceptance of one's feelings, values and attitudes. Emotional wellness includes the level in which one feels positive and energetic about the life that they live and being able to manage emotions in a constructive way when negative experiences are encountered.  Positive emotional wellness also allows one to be sensitive and have empathy towards others.

Characteristics of Emotional Wellness:

  • Being sensitive towards self and others
  • Identifying ways to cope with stress 
  • Being independent, but seeking help when needed
  • Taking responsibility for your own actions
  • Attending programs dealing with stress management
  • Attending programs that focus on relationship issues

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Evaluate Your Financial Wellness – Complete Survey for a Chance to Win a MUSC Promotional Prize

Share your story with us on what you already do that contributes to your emotional well-being and why it is beneficial to you. At the end of each month, we will draw from the submissions and award multiple MUSC Promotional Prizes (e.g. water bottle, beach towel, yoga mat)! 

QR code. Takes user to Redcap promotional survey about evaluating different health and wellness categories

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Recognizing the Signs of Burnout at School/Work 

Burnout with school or work overlaid on picture of little blue man in vice

SOURCE: Baylor College of Medicine, news release, April 5, 2018

A College Student's Guide to Avoiding Burnout

Juggling classes, jobs and extracurricular activities can lead to big-time burnout in college, but knowing its signs can help savvy students avoid it, one psychologist says.

"Burnout is described as feeling apathy and lack of interest toward activities that were previously enjoyable, some amount of work avoidance and less excitement over one's day-to-day tasks," said clinical psychologist Karen Lawson. She's an assistant professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

Lawson said it's important to watch for signs of burnout, because they can overlap with symptoms of depression. Additional symptoms of depression include sadness, fatigue, social withdrawal, irritability, changes in sleep or appetite, difficulty concentrating, or thoughts of self-harm.

"The best way to differentiate is whether the feeling of disinterest occurs for an extended period of time and if finding bright spots and things to look forward to don't work," she said.

To avoid burnout, Lawson recommends college students take more breaks; divide school work into smaller amounts; and make time for enjoyable things like eating with a friend or exercising. 

"Burnout is normal and common and understanding that can help students not feel so isolated and feel like something is wrong with them," she said. "Young people are under a huge amount of stress and pressure to achieve, but they have to work on developing skills and tools that can help improve on those feelings."

If students feel burned out and don't feel better within two to three weeks despite taking steps to ease the problem, they should see a mental health specialist, Lawson advised.

Related articles regarding student and healthcare professional burnout:

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Recognizing the Signs of Anxiety

Recognizing the Signs of Anxiety written over photo of ping pong balls with different emotions drawn on them

The following articles can provide a good overview of anxiety signs and symptoms. 

If you need to talk with a professional for any reason, MUSC Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) is here to help. You can schedule your appointment with CAPS online through LifeNet; just log in with your MUSC netID and password. You can also contact them by phone at 843-792-4930

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Increasing Your Resilience

I can't do it being cut with scissors 

Resilience is the ability to successfully navigate perceived stress and/or adversity using personal protective factors that buffer the negative effects of stress and promote personal growth and enhanced well-being.

Complete the Self-Assessment [PDF] and identify 2-3 personal protective factors you would like to enhance and/or develop. (PDF will be in box folder since I think link above is broken) and Read the following articles:

Resilience: Relationships Harry Mills, Ph.D. & Mark Dombeck, Ph.D.

The Road to Resilience, American Psychological Association,

Resilience is the ability to successfully navigate perceived stress and/or adversity using personal protective factors that buffer the negative effects of stress and promote personal growth and enhanced well-being.

Complete the Self-Assessment [PDF] and identify 2-3 personal protective factors you would like to enhance and/or develop. (PDF will be in box folder since I think link above is broken) and Read the following articles:

  • Resilience: Relationships Harry Mills, Ph.D. & Mark Dombeck, Ph.D.  
  • The Road to Resilience, American Psychological Association,   Arts in Healing is changing what’s possible in health care by providing access to the inherent healing powers of the arts to improve the health and well-being of the community. From art installations to bedside therapeutic interventions, our diverse programming aims to enhance the lives of patients, families, visitors and staff.

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CAPS Resources Page 

The Office of Counseling and Psychological Service has created a list of useful Resources to assist you in with a variety of topics covering matters that can exist in students’ professional and personal lives. Topics include tips for board preparation, breathing exercises, sleep hygiene, and much more! 

While you are there, be sure to visit the rest of the CAPS Website to access their full list of services as well as additional specific topics such as Managing Test Anxiety.

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Avoiding Stress Eating

Stress and Eating - Josh Brown, Ph.D. presents information about stress and eating, including tips for dealing better with stress and keeping it from affecting your eating, waistline, and health. 

Note: The video does not contain sound with the exception of one slide.

Stress and Eating: Getting out of the stress-eating cycle 

Also read the additional MUSC articles regarding Stress Eating: 

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MUSC Arts in Healing Program

The art of self care open studio

Arts in Healing is changing what’s possible in health care by providing access to the inherent healing powers of the arts to improve the health and well-being of the community. From art installations to bedside therapeutic interventions, our diverse programming aims to enhance the lives of patients, families, visitors and staff.

Founded in March 2018, Arts in Healing strives to offer comprehensive services to our patients, family members and community. With the support of MUSC Executive Director/CEO Patrick Cawley and philanthropy, the department has grown to include three creative arts therapists, art and music therapy interns, volunteers and various programs utilizing the arts.

For more information, please visit the MUSC Arts in Healing Program website.

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